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Resorts World casino pushes out Mayor Adams’ pal who moonlights in NYC job


Resorts World casino has “parted ways” with its security director Timothy Pearson after learning the longtime pal of Mayor Eric Adams had a second paid gig with the city.

The gambling company confirmed Pearson’s departure on Sunday, following the revelation last week that their top security official was serving as a public safety advisor to the mayor while getting paid by the New York City Economic Development Corporation.

Pearson’s gig with the city’s economic development arm raised ethics concerns as Resorts World is seeking to expand its gambling operations in Queens.

A source familiar with the matter told The Post Sunday that Pearson, who worked with Adams during their days at the NYPD, never informed his bosses that he was moonlighting and getting paid by EDC.

Company brass were aware that Pearson, the security director at Resorts World for 10 years, had served as an unpaid adviser on Adams’ transition team as the mayor prepared to enter City Hall in January, according to the source. Pearson was hired by EDC on May 31.

“Tim is a distinguished hero who served the City for many years as a leader at NYPD,” Resorts World said in a statement on Sunday. “Tim used those same skills to keep our facility and community safe for over a decade. We support his decision to lend his expertise to the City in its pursuit of making our streets safer, and we wish him well.”

Resort Worlds casino has "parted ways" with security director Timothy Pearson after learning he was appointed as Mayor Eric Adams' public safety advisor and worked for the city's Economic Development Corporation.
Resort Worlds casino has “parted ways” with security director Timothy Pearson after learning he was appointed as Mayor Eric Adams’ public safety advisor and worked for the city’s Economic Development Corporation.
Photo by Arturo Holmes/Getty Images

Resorts World is expected to apply for one of three new downstate casino licenses, which would allow it to expand its slots operation attached to the Aqueduct Raceway in Queens to also offer wagers on table games.

That made Pearson’s dual role untenable, the insider said.

Casino operators and developers have been lobbying Adams, who will have a say on where a gaming house is located. They are also attempting to woo Gov. Kathy Hochul, whose administration will play a big role in the process.

Under state law, a local siting board will be activated in an area where a casino is being proposed or expanded. The board  — which includes the mayor, borough president, council member, state senator and state assembly person — has power to block or approve the new casino licenses.

Pearson reportedly never told Resorts World that he was moonlighting for the city and getting paid by the city's Economic Development Corporation.
Pearson reportedly never told Resorts World that he was moonlighting for the city and getting paid by the city’s Economic Development Corporation.
Robert Mecea

Resorts World, which is part of the Malaysian-based casino giant Genting, has operated a slots parlor at the Aqueduct racetrack for more than a decade. Its long-term plans have always envisioned an expansion to offer table games at Aqueduct.

Council Speaker Adrienne Adams — whose district includes Resorts World at Aqueduct — has sent a letter to the state Gaming Commission in support of the casino firm’s desire for a new license to expand its operations there.

While EDC has no formal role in the regulatory or selection process, it could offer City Hall input on casino proposals.

Adams defended Pearson and said the city is lucky he has "chosen to focus all his efforts solely on our city’s public safety and COVID recovery efforts."
Adams defended Pearson and said the city is lucky he has “chosen to focus all his efforts solely on our city’s public safety and COVID recovery efforts.”
Paul Martinka

Pearson’s unusual dual public-private raised questions about running afoul of the city’s conflict of interest law, absent a waiver. 

“Full-time public servants may not work for any company or not-for-profit organization that has ‘business dealings’ with any City agency, unless they receive written permission from their agency head and the Board,” according to guidance posted on the website of the city’s ethics watchdog, the Conflicts of Interest Board.

In a statement on Sunday, City Hall lauded Pearson as having had “a long and distinguished career in both the public and private sectors, where he has spent decades keeping New Yorkers safe and creating security plans that have protected millions.”

“New Yorkers are lucky he chose to do the job for months without being paid a single dollar, and that he has now chosen to focus all his efforts solely on our city’s public safety and COVID recovery efforts,” said Adams spokesman Fabien Levy.

Pearson, who is retired from the NYPD, was recognized for responding to the Sept. 11, 2001 terrorist attacks.

Adams on Friday defended EDC’s hiring of his pal.

“If you know someone that’s qualified, like Tim Pearson — former inspector in the Police Department; a hero during 9/11, he was in the buildings when the buildings collapsed, instead of fleeing, he went back to help,” Adams said.

“Am I supposed to succumb to just those who are looking at hires — and they’re not saying he’s not qualified.”



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